HIS Kids

Camp Counselor Positions Still Needed for Seaside Adventure Camp

We need YOU to contribute to the work God is doing through Humbly I Serve in St. Thomas


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Are you looking for a new and exciting adventure this summer? Do you want to be a difference maker? We want you to partner with Humbly I Serve on our mission trip to Seaside Adventure Camp this summer and help bring needed change to the island of St. Thomas! Much work still needs to be done to point these people to Jesus every day; we must not only help through spiritual provision, but physical as well.

As one of the Virgin Islands (located in the Caribbean), St. Thomas is a beautiful, exotic, and breath-taking place to live. However, most of natives have never heard of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Many of the children are forced to bypass the normal pleasures of childhood in order to provide financially for their families. Rather than playing with their friends or doing homework, they spend their weeknights and weekends soliciting to strangers simply to help put dinner on the table.

IMG_2975For two weeks of the summer, Humbly I Serve’s project, HIS Kids, brings Seaside Adventure Camp to the shores of St. Thomas. We strive to bring uplifting activities to relieve children and teens from the pressures of life such as teen pregnancy, broken families, gang violence, drugs, and alcohol. Whether it’s working in the kitchen, playing kickball with the youngsters, leading Bible studies, or waking up just five minutes earlier every morning to pray for the thousands of lost souls, we need your help! Whatever your passions or skills, you will be able to use them to further the kingdom of God and show Christ to the people of St. Thomas.

If you are interested in being a camp counselor for Seaside Adventure Camp this June 18-July 5, you can check out our website for more information or to apply!


Create hope, be the change, join the movement.

HIS Vision, Inspirational, Missions

In It for the Long Haul

In It for the Long Haul

A Post By Haley

For those of you who don’t know me, I am not really a kid person, especially those I don’t really know and newborns. I like them; they are cute and funny, but I don’t really want to pick them up and cuddle them with their snotty noses and drool. I will never be one to ask a stranger if I can hold their baby or touch their pregnant stomachs – ew.

But, one night everyone was going to the orphanage, I thought, ‘eh- I just worked all day, the last thing I want to do is have a bunch of kids I don’t even know touch me and ask for hugs.’ But everyone was going, so of course, I wasn’t going to be lame, so I went.

When we got there it was just what I expected. Lots of kids and lots of touching. I was overwhelmed as I found myself suddenly surrounded by what seemed like hundreds of children- but turned out to be only about 35.

Little girls tugging on my arms asking what my name was and wanting to show me all their friends; I was thinking, ‘Okay, this is cute, but I’m ready to go.’

Then the kids started singing and I thought, ‘Oh my goodness, am I in Annie right now? How cliché is this. American girl goes to Haiti and gets her pictures with a ton of cute kids. Great, I can check this off my Facebook profile picture bucket list.’

So annoyed that I was actually there experiencing something that so many young girls long for, I politely listened to the kids.

I mean, it was cute.

As I stood there listening, all of a sudden I felt 25 pounds heavier –so confused, I looked to my right and a child had appeared on my hip! I thought, “Wait, how did that kid get up here?” He must have shimmied up onto me like I was a tree, because I know I didn’t pick him up. Comfortably situated on my hip, he said, “BonSawh (goodnight).”

‘Oh no! This kid is on me, touching me, touching my hair, I need to get him off of me,’ was my immediate thought.

Then the kids started singing again, “Open the Eyes of My Heart Lord.” And this kid- oh my goodness, started belting it out as loud as he possibly could.

I couldn’t help but burst out laughing at him, his head bobbing up and down, shouting the words so loudly.

The joy I felt through that child, just being held and enjoying singing together- made me cry happy tears. Hashtag, cliché embarrassing girl moment; hashtag, please don’t judge me for this, I know it’s cliché.

To be honest, I was thinking about how great these kids have it. Living in Haiti, in an orphanage where they are receiving an education, have two meals each day, and a place to sleep; they were so fortunate.

After the singing was finished, we had to go. I tried to tell this kid goodbye. “Ovawah,” I said. He didn’t let go. So I waved, that’s universal in every language, right? He clung on even tighter. So then, being afraid I would be left behind and stampeded by children, I started walking to catch up with the team.

I asked the little boy what his name was; he didn’t know what I said. A little girl came over and told me, “His name is Samuel.” Then she disappeared like a ninja; these kids were everywhere.

So I sat down on the ground and told him “Ovawah Samuel.” I basically pried the child off me and looked at him; he was sad. I was sad and also confused.

I started walking away and turned back to look; he was still standing there, watching me walk, as kids dodged around him running and skipping. Hurrying my walk- I turned around later; he was gone- probably had already forgotten me, playing with his friends.

I left feeling conflicted that night.

First, I actually ‘had a moment’ with a child I didn’t know and couldn’t communicate with. That was weird.

Second, those kids, for being in Haiti, are pretty well off. But is that really well off? How much more could be done to help the other kids who are on the streets?

Third, so many people come down to play with the orphans and leave. Or they come in and provide a care and then go. Personally, I’m learning the value of working with something sustainable.

This whole experience made me so happy that HIS Vision is not short term. We are in for the long haul; we are in Haiti to make a difference and we are determined.

It takes many people with all different talents and abilities to make a difference. If you are interested in Haiti and want to work with something sustainable and long term, let me know! We would love for you to come, have a couple cliché moments and meet some Samuels of your own.

HIS Vision, Inspirational, Missions

Erin Shares Her Experience in Haiti!

Erin Shares Her Experience in Haiti!

One of the first things I noticed in Haiti were children walking to school in perfectly clean, pressed uniforms. For most, the pants and skirts were made of wool. Hot, hot, hot temperatures and wool would make any child complain, but not in Haiti. School is available for very few. It is a privilege. Children recognize the sacrifices made for them to get an education and value the opportunity to learn. Maybe this is why so many visitors to the clinic expressed such gratitude when they were given glasses.

Just a few short months ago, eye care was not available to most Haitians, but the clinic makes it possible for students with poor eyesight to continue their studies and aspire to a better future. So many patients couldn’t help from grinning when they realized they could read small print easily.

Even though I am not a doctor and only played a small part in the clinic, I felt I got the greatest reward since I was the giver of the glasses and got to hear and see the appreciation of the blessing of sight.

It was an honor to be a part of making a difference in the lives of hundreds of people in one week’s time.

To learn more about the HIS Vision Project visit our website. To help give the gift of sight for those in need donate here and provide opportunity today!