Inspirational

Shannon’s Intern Experience

I am a journalism student. I spend the majority of my time reading, writing, reporting, and just trying to become better at what I do. When I began thinking about what I wanted to do for internships, if we’re being honest, a nonprofit was not in the forefront my mind. However, after an entire semester of working for one, I am so incredibly glad I did. I have learned things about dedication, hard work, and stepping out of your comfort zone here that a for-profit may never be able to teach me. I think that the most beneficial experiences we have are when we are taught to appreciate something bigger than ourselves. It would have been easy to make this internship all about myself. That is what an internship is for anyway, right? That it’s purpose is to serve me; my learning, my resume, my experience, etc. Thankfully, that was not the case.

Although I did learn many things for my own benefit, such as learning how to write as the face of an entire organization, how to meet deadlines, and how to take constructive criticism, the greater thing is I learned more about Humbly I Serve, how nonprofits operate, serving others and ultimately serving God. I learned how to push through those random days that consist of seemingly tedious tasks when, in reality, everything we do its for a bigger cause. Every email sent and every small task counts and that is what makes this internship so worthwhile.

Humbly I Serve is unique in the way that it not only tries to help people through the gift of physical provision (eye glasses, eye clinic, Seaside Adventure Camp, etc.), it reaches people with the love and gospel of Jesus. Giving a pair of glasses to someone who needs them has a temporary, earthly significance. But by providing those glasses, we have the opportunity to bring that person into a relationship with Jesus Christ. At that point, it becomes an eternal significance.

I may not be the person going to Haiti or St. Thomas or directly speaking to someone about Jesus, however, I can write a blog or newsletter that helps send someone else to do that.
No matter what the task, it has eternal value and that is how God uses us to expand His kingdom. I never had to question whether or not my work is making an impact because I know that God uses everything for His glory. In reality, what may seem like ordinary work to others is truly a blessing if I am able to bring glory to God. It is the most beautiful picture painted by the perfect Artist.

These are just a few of the things I have learned by interning at Humbly I Serve and if you are reading this, debating whether to pursue an internship with HIS or not, I would encourage you to try it. Eventually, I will be another intern elsewhere and I will have a career after college, however, I know that this experience will affect my future endeavors, wherever they are. Everything I do will be for God’s glory and there is nothing greater than learning that. I am blessed to have been Humbly I Serve’s writing intern!

Inspirational

From Personal Experience

From Personal Experience

My name is Daniel Bartlett and last summer I decided to do my internship at Humbly I Serve. I enjoyed their mission and saw that God was doing something there, although I didn’t have the full blast of exactly what it was. It also met a requirement for my Journalism degree, so I came on board, and looking back on it now, I’m glad I did.

I spent the whole summer working as their Content Manager, working on newsletters, sending out emails, crafting press releases, among other tasks. And this was like other jobs that I have done, but what made it a real special place for me was being surrounded by good people whom I enjoyed their company, but also ones who really had a heart for the Lord.

It probably took about a month into my internship before God really started working on my heart. I did a lot of work with the His Vision Project mostly. And we all know how it is; you hear some statistics, see some photos of the hurt and turmoil that is amounting in these other countries, and your heart becomes stirred. All of which happened to me, but even more so, because I was the one doing a lot of the research that went into gathering these facts, and really digging into how the other part of the world lives, and what I saw shocked me.

I’ve never been out of the United States, but I know that there are some hurting people living in some pretty rough places all around the world. We’ve all seen it somewhere or sometime, probably on TV or online or on a billboard; People who are hungry, thirsty, in pain or with disease. This is so sad to see, people suffering, struggling with no one to help them. But is there really no one to help them? The even sadder fact is that there are more than enough people to help. Although many will see, very few will actually do something about it.

And I’m not just talking about people who are able to give money, although this is a great means of helping, but even just giving their time, their company and just being there with these people to love them when they have no one else to do so. If Christ was still walking this Earth, I believe that he would be out there on the front lines, ladling food for the hungry at a soup kitchen or helping a woman carry fresh water back to her village for her children or just sitting, listening to a person’s story, because everyone has one. So what’s yours? What’s mine?

I am realizing more and more each day that we’ve only got one shot at this life, and every day we are one step closer to eternity, and tomorrow is never guaranteed. I just found out this week that my friend’s brother just came down with a rare form of bone cancer, and he is not even twenty years old. Nothing is guaranteed. Nothing is lasting. Nothing but one and that is God. He is unchanging and his promises stand true.

And when we stand at those pearly gates, and stand before our God, what will we have to show for ourselves? That we accumulated wealth, had nice things and lived a comfortable life, or that we pushed through the muck and grime, gave all we had and held nothing back, and now, huffing and puffing out of breath, we stand before Jesus at God’s right hand, probably a little smelly and sweating, feeling accomplished and confident. Christ smiles and hands us a white robe, and we hear, “Well done my good and faithful servant.”

This is beautiful music to my ears, but this is ahead of us for all who believe. But now is not the time to linger, now is the time to act, to persevere, to take ourselves where we may not always be comfortable going, do things we may not want to do. Or maybe you do, if your heart is in the right place. I know I only have one shot, and I want to make it count. How about you?

HIS Vision, Inspirational, Missions

In It for the Long Haul

In It for the Long Haul

A Post By Haley

For those of you who don’t know me, I am not really a kid person, especially those I don’t really know and newborns. I like them; they are cute and funny, but I don’t really want to pick them up and cuddle them with their snotty noses and drool. I will never be one to ask a stranger if I can hold their baby or touch their pregnant stomachs – ew.

But, one night everyone was going to the orphanage, I thought, ‘eh- I just worked all day, the last thing I want to do is have a bunch of kids I don’t even know touch me and ask for hugs.’ But everyone was going, so of course, I wasn’t going to be lame, so I went.

When we got there it was just what I expected. Lots of kids and lots of touching. I was overwhelmed as I found myself suddenly surrounded by what seemed like hundreds of children- but turned out to be only about 35.

Little girls tugging on my arms asking what my name was and wanting to show me all their friends; I was thinking, ‘Okay, this is cute, but I’m ready to go.’

Then the kids started singing and I thought, ‘Oh my goodness, am I in Annie right now? How cliché is this. American girl goes to Haiti and gets her pictures with a ton of cute kids. Great, I can check this off my Facebook profile picture bucket list.’

So annoyed that I was actually there experiencing something that so many young girls long for, I politely listened to the kids.

I mean, it was cute.

As I stood there listening, all of a sudden I felt 25 pounds heavier –so confused, I looked to my right and a child had appeared on my hip! I thought, “Wait, how did that kid get up here?” He must have shimmied up onto me like I was a tree, because I know I didn’t pick him up. Comfortably situated on my hip, he said, “BonSawh (goodnight).”

‘Oh no! This kid is on me, touching me, touching my hair, I need to get him off of me,’ was my immediate thought.

Then the kids started singing again, “Open the Eyes of My Heart Lord.” And this kid- oh my goodness, started belting it out as loud as he possibly could.

I couldn’t help but burst out laughing at him, his head bobbing up and down, shouting the words so loudly.

The joy I felt through that child, just being held and enjoying singing together- made me cry happy tears. Hashtag, cliché embarrassing girl moment; hashtag, please don’t judge me for this, I know it’s cliché.

To be honest, I was thinking about how great these kids have it. Living in Haiti, in an orphanage where they are receiving an education, have two meals each day, and a place to sleep; they were so fortunate.

After the singing was finished, we had to go. I tried to tell this kid goodbye. “Ovawah,” I said. He didn’t let go. So I waved, that’s universal in every language, right? He clung on even tighter. So then, being afraid I would be left behind and stampeded by children, I started walking to catch up with the team.

I asked the little boy what his name was; he didn’t know what I said. A little girl came over and told me, “His name is Samuel.” Then she disappeared like a ninja; these kids were everywhere.

So I sat down on the ground and told him “Ovawah Samuel.” I basically pried the child off me and looked at him; he was sad. I was sad and also confused.

I started walking away and turned back to look; he was still standing there, watching me walk, as kids dodged around him running and skipping. Hurrying my walk- I turned around later; he was gone- probably had already forgotten me, playing with his friends.

I left feeling conflicted that night.

First, I actually ‘had a moment’ with a child I didn’t know and couldn’t communicate with. That was weird.

Second, those kids, for being in Haiti, are pretty well off. But is that really well off? How much more could be done to help the other kids who are on the streets?

Third, so many people come down to play with the orphans and leave. Or they come in and provide a care and then go. Personally, I’m learning the value of working with something sustainable.

This whole experience made me so happy that HIS Vision is not short term. We are in for the long haul; we are in Haiti to make a difference and we are determined.

It takes many people with all different talents and abilities to make a difference. If you are interested in Haiti and want to work with something sustainable and long term, let me know! We would love for you to come, have a couple cliché moments and meet some Samuels of your own.

HIS Vision, Inspirational, Missions

The Way Melinda Sees It

The Way Melinda Sees It

If I had to use one word to describe my trip to Haiti, it would be refreshing. Going with a team of seven, five of which had never been to Haiti with HIS Vision before, I was quickly reminded of why I had such a passion to help this country. Seeing the team’s reactions to the poverty and lack of eye care, created an even more burdensome longing to bring hope to the Haitians.

I was so content when I saw the equipment patiently waiting our team at the clinic. It was almost as if the boxes shouted, “You did it! We are here and the hard work paid off!” I was happy!

Then the happiness morphed into anxiety.

While the satisfaction of completing stage one was wonderful, the thought of starting phase two was almost too much.

I looked around at the the new tiles, windows, doors and electric work that had been completed. The beautiful detailed paint job caught my eye. My mind compared and contrasted the differences from the first time I stepped into this building. A dirt floor now replaced with tiles. Broken walls were now standing straight. Garbage piles around the rooms transformed into piles of bubble wrap and cardboard boxes holding glasses. I realized the Lord had done a miracle.

I put my fear behind me. Using the hard work that had been completed as my inspiration, I became energized. The second phase was going to become a reality, the HIS Vision Clinic would be opening in the spring! It was finally coming together and it was incredible.

For the clinic, our main need at this point is Ophthalmic Equipment:
– Edger
– Auto Refractor
– Visual Field Machine

We saw around 400 patients this trip. Our team ferociously tackled the task to give everyone special care, meeting all their needs individually.

Leaving Haiti I felt free. We completed so many tasks, including getting our NGO status in Haiti. We set up the clinic and now it’s a matter of tying up loose ends and a few pieces of equipment. This trip was a milestone; it was refreshing and I was often reminded, “with God, nothing is impossible.”

A gigantic heartfelt thanks to all who donated equipment, finances and time to make this dream a reality.

-Melinda, CEO

HIS Vision, Inspirational, Missions

Erin Shares Her Experience in Haiti!

Erin Shares Her Experience in Haiti!

One of the first things I noticed in Haiti were children walking to school in perfectly clean, pressed uniforms. For most, the pants and skirts were made of wool. Hot, hot, hot temperatures and wool would make any child complain, but not in Haiti. School is available for very few. It is a privilege. Children recognize the sacrifices made for them to get an education and value the opportunity to learn. Maybe this is why so many visitors to the clinic expressed such gratitude when they were given glasses.

Just a few short months ago, eye care was not available to most Haitians, but the clinic makes it possible for students with poor eyesight to continue their studies and aspire to a better future. So many patients couldn’t help from grinning when they realized they could read small print easily.

Even though I am not a doctor and only played a small part in the clinic, I felt I got the greatest reward since I was the giver of the glasses and got to hear and see the appreciation of the blessing of sight.

It was an honor to be a part of making a difference in the lives of hundreds of people in one week’s time.

To learn more about the HIS Vision Project visit our website. To help give the gift of sight for those in need donate here and provide opportunity today!